Stanford Art Spaces
From December 12, 1998 to February 4, 1999, Stanford Art Spaces features an exhibit by three artists:
Courtney Peaters
Paintings
Merl Ross
Paintings
& Works On Paper
Ted Vasin
Paintings
© 1998 Courtney Peaters © 1998 Merl Ross © 1998 Ted Vasin

This exhibit is located on the Stanford University campus in four buildings: the Allen Center for Integrated Systems (CIS), Gates Computer Science, Terman Engineering Center, and Humanities and Sciences.    

Courtney Peaters


© 1998 Courtney Peaters
As a non-conformist, Peaters relates to the "no rules" attitude of artists such as Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein and later Keith Haring. Although she admits that art by Warhol and other Pop-artists can be trashy at times, the American pop culture remains her primary inspiration. She also appreciates the abilities of those artists who have successfully commercialized their visions. Peaters credits French artist Fernand Leger, as being one of her main influences, and considers him an "early Pop-artist."

She acknowledges being heavily influenced by the bold, colorful graphics of comic books, and by television's golden age of animation, in particular, cartoon series like Rocky and Bullwinkle. Peaters explains "I like the striking confidence of color bordered by a black line. I like art that is easy to understand and doesn't intimidate the viewer."

The ability to laugh and make others laugh is a primary goal of Peaters' work. She frequently finds herself laughing out loud at what amuses her. The innocent muses of her own observations, which may seem irreverent to some when spontaneously expressed audibly, she has learned to transubstantiate through her art. Humor is the first thing one senses when introduced to the energetic androgynous characters portrayed in the paintings of Courtney Peaters. She best describes them as "Images frozen in my mind, most often friends, and other people I've been privileged to meet. One thing they all have in common is they make me smile. In return I paint them, recapturing those moments, returning the favor."

Peaters produces her own distinctive blends of rich, bold colors which she flawlessly applies onto her canvases with seamless strokes as if they were actually airbrushed. These characteristics along with their inherent charm, contribute to the alluring quality and overall success of the paintings.


Works are for sale directly from the artist. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator Stanford Art Spaces (650) 725-3622, marigros@stanford.edu


Merl Ross


© 1998 Merl Ross
"For me, the act of painting is an ongoing process of unraveling the recollections, dreams and anxieties of my inner world. By continually investigating my physical and emotional environment, I have created a personal language of abstract forms. These forms are often inspired by my response to the visible and at times hidden beauty found in nature, triggering both subtle and powerful emotions in me.

"When painting, I am constructing another world that contains an inner logic of time, space, and communication. This world has no morning or midnight, no beginning or end; instead, I try to capture a suspended moment in time. Ideally, the images act with the unexpected quality of syncopated rhythm, accenting a beat normally unaccented.

"My paintings contain numerous layers of images; often an image will be buried within the work, only hinting at its form's full existence. It is these layers and traces of creation which intrigue me; for they are a way of covering and uncovering, a way of seeing and then seeing again. Ultimately, I strive to create an atmosphere in my work that is filled with vestiges that I have known and felt. My artistic process is stimulated by the search for a previously unknown destination. It is this heightened anticipation that continually fuels my passion for painting."


Works are for sale directly from the artist. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator Stanford Art Spaces (650) 725-3622, marigros@stanford.edu


Ted Vasin


© 1998 Ted Vasin
Theodore Vasin was born in Moscow in the 1960's, the son of an industrial designer. It was Alexander Falkovsky, Theodore's grandfather, a well-known and respected impressionist in the Moscow underground art scene, who discovered young Ted's early passion for sketching and painting.

1996 found Ted in San Francisco with the philosophy that "We take for granted things that surround us. Influence us. Shape us. Control us." He sees emotions and personalities in these things, these objects. He sees them being born, sees them interact, notes their change, appreciates how they develop texture and substance, feels for them when they grow old, and mourns when they are broken down and thrown away.

Ted's art explores the relationships among these things, the endless combinations. From grotesque to beautiful, complex to simple, meaningful to obscure, large to small, and tall to short. These shapes and forms permeate our daily existence and balance our perspective of the physical world. [excerpted from J. Vokin]


Works are for sale directly from the artist. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator Stanford Art Spaces (650) 725-3622, marigros@stanford.edu


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