Stanford Art Spaces
September 3, 2010 to October 28, 2010, Stanford Art Spaces features this exhibit:

Ken Holden
Gianna Marino
Pat Sherwood
Neal Boor

de Young Museum 10749 © 2010

Companions © 2010

Way Home © 2010

Power Trip © 2010


This exhibit is located on the Stanford University campus, primarily in the Paul G. Allen building (C.I.S.). The building is open 8:30 am to 5 pm, Monday through Friday. A directory is available at the reception desk.

Most works are for sale directly from the artists. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator, at (650) 725-3622 or

Ken Holden
 
de Young Museum 10361 © 2010

Ken Holden’s images in the exhibit are all taken within the de Young Museum in San Francisco. “Subtle light, compositional discipline and variant color hues sensitize me to imagine a scene in an unconventional and thought-provoking way to convey a deeper sense of underlying beauty. I seek-out subjects that play-off a narrow color palette to capture images that appear more monochromatic, yet paradoxically maintain a full color spectrum.”

Using photography as a medium enables Holden to envision artwork that provides a journey of discovery.  He wants the viewer to question the artwork in terms of their traditional biases; is the work photography, painting, collage, or something entirely different? Does the medium matter? This imagery is intended to form a bridge between rigid traditional artistic interpretation and evolving technology that questions how art is perceived. Holden’s work is inspired by French Impressionism, which captures the fleeting and momentary images of everyday life that we are unconscious of and yet are ever present surrounding us. These as-shot images express the unaltered state of reality.


For more art by Ken Holden, click here.




Gianna Marino
 
Dancing in the Box © 2010

Gianna Marino was born in San Francisco and spent her early years galloping horses through Golden Gate Park. She has traveled throughout Africa, the Indian subcontinent, southeast Asia, China, Indonesia, Australia, New Zealand, Tahiti, Noumea, crewed on sailboats in Mexico and the Caribbean and lived in Europe. She has had a variety of jobs, from muralist apprentice to driving horse carriages in the park. After several years of designing toys, Gianna began a new career in painting.

Each of her paintings begins with a place, direction or story. She is inspired by the migration of animals, the origins of where something comes from, how it got there and why it remains or leaves. Human expansion changes nature and its course, and Gianna finds the layering of maps and natures path to be the perfect place to tell that story. The mixed media paintings in this exhibit are created using a collage of hand made papers, pencil sketches, inks, and acrylic glazes over canvas.

Gianna has written and illustrated numerous articles for travel and leisure magazines. Her first children’s book, Zoopa (Chronicle Books, 2005) was nominated for the Northern California Book Award in Children's Literature. Her latest book is One Too Many.


For more art by Gianna Marino, click here.




Pat Sherwood
 
Early Morning © 2010

Pat Sherwood’s paintings are about a different landscape, one seen from above and at the same time from the traditional ground view. A recent critic said “A good abstract painting should make your mouth water.” These paintings hopefully do; with large swashes of buttery paint in khaki tones, interspersed with black lines and flat areas of colorful wash. The pictures are layered canvases with powerful drawing elements carved into or painted in black. The paintings are splendid creamy textured studies in brush and palette knife. Dark browns, cool blues, and touches of reds and yellows are painted in casual bonds of color outlined by dark tones. The canvases are tension filled with powerful elements of landscape, drawn, carved and layered into luminous compositions of controlled chaos, deliberately “un-slick” and full of creative energy.


For more art by Pat Sherwood, click here.




Neal Boor
 
Wonderful Day © 2010

Neal Boor’s primary focus has always been in the arts. “I am involved with all of the elements and principles of art. I look for design in nature, man-made objects, shape, color, line and texture. After many years of painting, I have gained a large repertoire of tools to work with, which involve judgments on the use of elements and principles.”

Boor sees art as a vital symbolic language, with which he hopes to reach people, to have someone say “yes”. He reflects that “we all share the common experiences of the human condition, and I hope to trigger these remembrances with my work.”




Most works are for sale directly from the artists. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator, at (650) 725-3622 or
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