Stanford Art Spaces
July 31, 2009 to September 24, 2009, Stanford Art Spaces features this exhibit:

Nancy Eckels
Paintings
Werner Glinka
Mixed Media Assemblages
Asha Menghrajani
Paintings

Sea Wall © 2009

WS711 © 2009

Chariots of the Gods © 2009


This exhibit is located on the Stanford University campus, primarily in the Paul G. Allen building (C.I.S.). The building is open 8:30 am to 5 pm, Monday through Friday. A directory is available at the reception desk.

Most works are for sale directly from the artists. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator, at (650) 725-3622 or

Nancy Eckels
 
Canyons © 2009

Nancy Eckels’ paintings mirror the joy and energy she feels when creating works of uninhibited color, movement and emotion. Her mission is to make the viewer fall in love with her paintings by sharing her emotions, drawing them in and engulfing their experience with feeling, whether it’s bold, in-your-face, good will, exuberance and passion or a more subtle introspective mood. Her technique is improvisational, painting off the top of her head with little or no plan, using only the emotion of the moment and the mental pictures from her life’s experience.

A self-taught artist, Nancy has been painting full time for ten years since ending another creative career. As a child, she dabbled in art, but always wanted to experience show business. She happily worked in television for many years, and was a director on the CBS daytime drama, “The Bold and the Beautiful” when she decided to move on to painting. Given her family background, it seemed like the most natural transition she could make. Her parents met in an oil painting class, and her sister, aunts and uncles are all artists.


For more art by Nancy Eckels, click here or here.




Werner Glinka
 
WS861 © 2009

Werner Glinka was born and raised in Germany, in an industrial town of coal mines and steel plants. He was educated as an electrical engineer before moving to Silicon Valley for a career as an engineering and marketing executive. After he moved to the Santa Cruz Mountains, he developed his unique style of assemblage combining the influences of the sleek, steel-and-glass modernism of the Bauhaus movement with the simple, functional grace of Japanese landscapes.

Driven by instinct, and informed by a highly developed minimalist aesthetic sense of balance and proportion, Glinka’s work is simplicity itself. But simplicity is never simple. Even his materials carry emotional weight: barbed wire, ash, and pearls. He has always found inspiration at the intersection of man and nature, and the interaction and juxtaposition of the two. The triggers for his work range from something as ordinary and invisible as an asphalt-filled crack in the street, to the in-your-face complexity and near-chaos of New York City. Like an antenna picking up the news we deem important about why and how we are here, he processes these signals and sends them back out into the world, fulfilling his artist’s role as a feedback loop in an intelligent system.


For more art by Werner Glinka, click here.




Asha Menghrajani
 
Urban Harmony © 2009

Asha Menghrajani is a world traveler at home in the cultural crossroads. She grew up in the Philippines and traveled extensively before choosing the United States as her home in 1992. She has extensive training in charcoal drawing, oil, chinese watercolor painting and fabric design. She fuses all her knowledge together into a rich mixed media process. In her paintings, Asha presents chaos as the perfection that it is, allowing for complete surrender.

Her painting transports you from reality to a vibrant, mystical and abstract world, where you are the story teller, creating and interpreting your own stories.

“My process in painting is one which is more meditative and intuitive. I experience calmness, peacefulness and solitude. I believe that making art feels good and brings pleasure to others. Looseness and uncertainty, above all, are important to my interpretation of the mysterious energy of the spirit.”


For more art by Asha Menghrajani, click here.



Most works are for sale directly from the artists. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator, at (650) 725-3622 or
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