Stanford Art Spaces
May 22, 2009 to July 23, 2009, Stanford Art Spaces features this exhibit:

Sobhan Dutta
Paintings & Drawings
Lar Landa
Paintings
Sandra Chen Weinstein
Photography

Musicians © 2009

Dancers © 2009

Gypsy Swirl © 2009


This exhibit is located on the Stanford University campus, primarily in the Paul G. Allen building (C.I.S.). The building is open 8:30 am to 5 pm, Monday through Friday. A directory is available at the reception desk.

Most works are for sale directly from the artists. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator, at (650) 725-3622 or

Sobhan Dutta
 
Musician © 2009

The power and beauty of Dutta’s technique is his use of color and texture to give volume to the figures, the fluidity of lines and strokes to depict sensuality of the forms, and his ability to internalize experience and express it in a style that is delightfully refreshing. The cornerstone in his art is the restoration of silence, which he describes as “a quality of amazement that we feel in the presence of the world, and an attendant ability to surrender ourselves before its enchantment.” Dutta’s ability to juxtapose contrary emotions, the real and imaginary, and the known and unknown, makes his art not only a form of self-expression but a reflection of the collective unconscious. His paintings derive their impact from their details and from the subtle yet furious undercurrent of cool, logical analysis that sweeps them up to tantalizing heights.


For more art by Sobhan Dutta, click here.




Lar Landa
 
Juggler Wolf © 2009

Lar Landa’s paintings and sculptures are unabashedly based on the figure. His vivid images are drawn from his extensive travels, childhood memories, and Italian heritage, as well as reading and classical studies. His works reflects a lusty preoccupation with theater, psychology, personal and folk symbolism. Incorporating the masks, postures, costumes and color of the Italian carnevale, the immediate feeling is celebratory. Beneath this vivid presentation however, a deeper and darker emphasis is often suggested. There are enticing symbols and dichotomies to explore in this work. The Wolf, which is generally associated with menace and primal fear, often seems to serve as a protective spirit in Landa’s paintings. The shadowed and sober-looking “Signorinas” contrast with frankly assertive, earthy, sensual females in other paintings. Ambiguity is implied with expressive figures that incorporate the features of both genders. Now you see it, and now you don’t. Freud and Jung would certainly enjoy a heated debate on his work.





Sandra Chen Weinstein
 
Veiled © 2009

With stories of mystery behind the thin Odhani (veil) that covers a woman’s face with its subtle hues, we are led to wonder at her sensitivity and delicate charm while we are intrigued by her captivating demeanor. The veil also presents a barrier between the fiction and reality in one’s life; there is the truth beneath the thin layer of our outward appearance from our disparate backgrounds to our modern living in the West. People celebrate religious heritage and shared cultural experience in colorful and intimate mingling of ancient customs and modern experience. Sandra portrays people in their ritual, spiritual daily life and the rich Indian landscape. From north to south, India presents a wondrous symphony of humanity and nature. The images show the intensity and uniqueness of the blend of ancient cultures in modern times. Sandra’s passion is to document people’s inner world in the vibrancy of their diverse cultures, especially to the fading traditions that still shine through the blanketing pressure of modernization and the global economy. Her ultimate goal is to illuminate the timeless human condition through her relationship to the subject, thus revealing the unguarded person and complex emotions at a moment in time.


For more art by Sandra Chen Weinstein, click here.



Most works are for sale directly from the artists. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator, at (650) 725-3622 or
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