Stanford Art Spaces
March 20, 2009 to May 14, 2009, Stanford Art Spaces features this exhibit:

Timothy Clare
Mixed Media
Tamara Danoyan
Photography
Priyanka Gupta
Paintings

Heading West © 2009

Through the Net © 2009

The Spiritual Relationship © 2009


This exhibit is located on the Stanford University campus, primarily in the Center for Integrated Systems (CIS). The building is open 8:30 am to 5 pm, Monday through Friday. A directory is available at the CIS reception desk.

Most works are for sale directly from the artists. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator, at (650) 725-3622 or

Timothy Clare
 
California Suite I © 2009

My work is based on the quilting tradition, but it is also influenced by Pop Culture, advertising, folk art, and ethnic arts. I use many images and patterns which are printed on mostly tin and other metal pieces and then arranged and combined into the final composition. Like a quilt, where the fabric is sewn together, the metal pieces are assembled and then nailed onto plywood. Quilts are often thought of as cozy and homey, evoking a sense of comfort and security. I consider mine in the same way, in spite of the contradiction of the hard, cold nature of the materials used. By exposing a constructed ideal that stands in sharp contrast to a more complicated past, my work stirs authentic emotions of reminiscence for one’s place in family and cultural history.


For more art by Timothy Clare, click here.




Tamara Danoyan
 
Joy © 2009

When I photograph, I am in my happy place, where the concerns of the everyday fade away. There are no thoughts or judgments, only the senses celebrating the joy of existence. My images become testaments to the moments lived fully and intensely in the present­. Preserved on film and imprinted in my memory; the fleeting light, textures, detail, and juxtapositions of shapes or color become meaningful and timeless. Photography to me is the answer to the longing that many of us experience and which Goethe expressed in Faust’s plea to the moment: “Stay thou art so fair!”

While I feel that I have been taking mental pictures for many years, these images remained in my head until I took my first black and white photography class. Black and white film remains my favorite medium, but I also do color. I have been a staff member at Stanford University for 10 years.


For more art by Tamara Danoyan, click here.




Priyanka Gupta
 
Colors of India 2 © 2008

Coming from Kolkata, India, I use artistic expression as a means to discover myself and explore spirituality. Involvement with spiritual organizations and readings, and my own experiences during deep meditation provide me with inspiration for expression. My quest to hypothesize about life’s purpose and meaning, paralleled with real-world experiences, form a gamut of emotions that are reflected on my canvases. I wish to express an inner truth that lies beyond the immediate nature of the visual world, combined with the emotive, psychological and mystical appeal of pure color.

The spiral is a recurring motif in my paintings. An ancient symbol of goddess, womb, fertility, feminine serpent force, continual change, and the evolution of the universe, it is the symbol of the infinite Self, the mysterious connection with the Divinity and a visualization of one of seven 'chakras' or energy centers that affect the workings of the body both emotionally and physically. Another recurring motif is traditional Indian Mehendi designs - known as Henna in most countries – which are regarded as blessings for luck, joy, and beauty.

By embedding these symbols found also in textiles that women use to adorn themselves, I attempt to bridge the cultural gaps between the eastern and western worlds that I inhabit, express the subtle strength of women, and explore feminism in the context of Indian society. I intend to further carry on this quest for ultimate truth.


For more art by Priyanka Gupta, click here.



Most works are for sale directly from the artists. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator, at (650) 725-3622 or
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