Stanford Art Spaces
February 15, 2008 to April 10, 2008, Stanford Art Spaces features this exhibit:

Kent Manske
Original Prints
Kenney Mencher
Paintings
Lynn Rubenzer
Paintings

25 Concerns © 2008

In Martini Veritas © 2008

Geisha © 2008


This exhibit is located on the Stanford University campus, primarily in the Center for Integrated Systems (CIS). The building is open 8:30 am to 5 pm, Monday through Friday. A directory is available at the CIS reception desk.

Most works are for sale directly from the artists. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator, at (650) 725-3622 or

Kent Manske
 
Finder Map C © 2008

Introspection drives my need to create. Processing thoughts, ideas and observations is the nature of my studio activity. Each mark metaphorically documents an experience, comments on a situation, or reveals a process of thinking. My artworks reflect the outcome of what I regard to be serious play. I’m inquisitive about things I don’t understand and create picture narratives to explore possibilities. This activity seems to be both therapy and entertainment.

I believe that most of my works are in and of themselves questions. As I find questions are more interesting than answers, the work seeks not closure but further inquiry. Printmaking processes (both traditional and digital) serve the conceptual development of my images and satisfy my passion for working with materials. Completed works are realized as fine art prints and artists’ books.


For more art by Kent Manske, click here.




Kenney Mencher
 
Second Sight © 2008

Mencher’s works are like the film Being There with Peter Sellers. Citing literature, television, film, and stage drama, as major influences on his work, Mencher’s objective is to present a figurative composition divorced from its context, forcing viewers to create their own interpretation of the narrative. By combining calligraphic gestural brushstrokes with passages of tight traditional glazing techniques, his art explores the thread of human connection that is woven into our experiences. Collaged from posed photographs and pop culture, his paintings are frozen moments in a play. Sometimes these moments are outrageous or surreal, and the figures are character actors caught in the action.

“…The subjects of Mencher’s work hold coffee cups, sit in leather chairs, make confessions, and declare intentions, but the silence of the paint leaves us only a visual trace as to what’s being said and what understandings are being clarified… You are reminded of your own lost moments – the people you should have comforted, but didn’t; the lover you trusted who stopped returning your calls; the companion at work who quietly knifed you in committee and then cheerfully chatted you up at the coffee break.” – W. Wisner


For more art by Kenney Mencher, click here.




Lynn Rubenzer
 
Sky Horses © 2008

Lynn Rubenzer paints dense, fantastical cities populated by shy giants, scarlet monkeys, and flying pterodactyls. Using the stretched canvas as a stage for deeper exploration into the human condition, strange and inquisitive characters emerge like images reflected in a bar mirror during a night of transient delight. Rubenzer’s work invites the viewer to ponder the current state of our society, from the fragility of community to the emotional threads that universally unite.

Lynn’s work has been exhibited in various galleries and art organizations in San Francisco. It is also featured on several music CD jackets and on the cover of the novel All Night Movie by Alicia Borinsky.


For more art by Lynn Rubenzer, click here.



Most works are for sale directly from the artists. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator, at (650) 725-3622 or
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