Stanford Art Spaces
From August 7, 1998 to October 1, 1998, Stanford Art Spaces features an exhibit by two artists:
Greg Gawlowski
Photography
Larry Van Deusen
Paintings - "My Global Village"
© 1998 Greg Gawlowski © 1998 Larry Van Deusen

This exhibit is located on the Stanford University campus in four buildings: the Allen Center for Integrated Systems (CIS), Gates Computer Science, Terman Engineering Center, and Humanities and Sciences.    

Greg Gawlowski


© 1998 Greg Gawlowski
"Cameras to me are like words to a poet. They can be used to express the simplest thoughts and ideas, or artfully applied to reveal the world's wonders."

Since graduating from the University of Oregon with a degree in Photojournalism, Greg Gawlowski has turned his eye to travel photography over the last 18 years.

He has made ten trips throughout Europe, including living in Geneva for a year. He finds his greatest inspiration when he travels to new lands. Photography provides him with the tools for capturing scenes that become a looking glass into the history, culture, and character of a country. His goal is to render on film some of the awe and excitement he felt when the shutter was tripped. "If I can emotionally transport a viewer by a photograph, then I've succeeded." Whether the subject is a landscape, a street scene, or architecture, he hopes to provide a visual taste of that country.

His photography has been shown in galleries in the Pacific Northwest, as well as numerous exhibits in San Francisco. His prints have been collected by individuals across the country and internationally, and his work is represented in three photo stock agencies. In addition Greg regularly sells to most of the major calendar and poster companies in the U.S. He is married and lives in San Francisco.


Works are for sale directly from the artist. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator Stanford Art Spaces (650) 725-3622, marigros@stanford.edu


Larry Van Deusen


© 1998 Larry Van Deusen















© 1998 Larry Van Deusen
East Bay artist Larry Van Deusen has recently had solo shows in San Francisco and Chicago, and has been featured in group shows in Texas, Kansas, and Florida. Larry is a co-founder of the Phantom Gallery in Hayward.

My Global Village is a series of paintings, each of which is a complete entity but is also linked visibly to its neighbors, forming a larger whole. The imagery is based on Larry's large collection of visual artifacts (labels, toys, street debris, tickets, postcards, etc.), which he gathered locally over the years. He turned them into collage still lifes, then enlarged them into acrylic paintings. The size of each canvas corresponds to the average American television set in 1990.

These multi-cultural and technical images reflect the diversity and fast changing scene that we all live and share in the Bay Area. We are immersed in an ever growing technology driven, multi-cultural environment outside of our own front doors, or in our living rooms via the television. This rapid fire mass information fractures and challenges our sense of a constant traditional cultural reality. "I am trying to show that it's possible to link together the many pieces into an expanding, inclusive, vibrant tolerant vision of global culture based on mutual respect for all our differences, and that it's that universal difference, ironically, that makes all of us so much alike."

My Global Village is a four part series of paintings, two of which are in the current exhibit. "One World Vision" (Part 2) has paintings of spiritual and work related artifacts. They reflect our community's differing beliefs and ways in which people contribute their skills to the fabric of daily life. As jumbled together as these images may be, they still point to a single vision of people everywhere to maintain their identity through autonomous systems. "Tolerance Dream" (Part 3) has fourteen paintings with images in the gray area of culture. Many times these types of images may be taboo in one culture, but interpreted in another as a religious icon. The tattoo is an example. In much of western culture it is seen as a mark worn by people in the seedy outsider class, whereas in some eastern cultures it is seen as a high art form with spiritual connections, But it's these types of images that challenge our sense of mortality, reminding us that all cultures are fluid and spill over into our lives, reforming our own notions of who we are.


Works are for sale directly from the artist. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator Stanford Art Spaces (650) 725-3622, marigros@stanford.edu


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