Stanford Art Spaces
From June 5, 1998 to July 30, 1998, Stanford Art Spaces features an exhibit by three artists:
Terry Acebo Davis
Lithographs & Monoprints
Lenore Chinn
Paintings
Seta Injeyan
Paintings
Kanin - © 1998 T. Acebo Davis Walt Whitman's Recital - © 1998 Lenore Chinn Angel's Flight - © 1998 Seta Injeyan

This exhibit is located on the Stanford University campus in four buildings: the Allen Center for Integrated Systems (CIS), Gates Computer Science, Terman Engineering Center, and Humanities and Sciences.     Reception on June 24 from 3pm to 5pm at CIS

Terry Acebo Davis


Kanin - © 1998 Terry Acebo Davis
"Plaguing me are the questions of: diversity, gender, discrimination, and racial injustices that continue to pervade society. I draw with bold, expressive lines that take on symmetrical forms or triangulated trajectories. The use of lines to create spatial tension, movement or volume on surfaces, incorporated with collage: book pages, torn wall posters, maps or sheet music, are elements I use freely in my prints. Other recurring themes include the use of the cross, foreign script, elements in nature and numerals, which speak to religion history, ritual, and order.

"It is a print artist's sensibility to work serially and collectively. Each piece dictates what the next piece will become, and each series seeds the next body of work. Through the process of working, I find myself seeking answers to the Eastern-Western dualities that taunt me. I find meditative solutions in the process of making art. Process offers a level of resolution, regardless of logic, that can lead to new work or revisiting old work that may hold personal and spiritual meaning for the present."

Terry Acebo Davis balances her artistic career with her work as a pediatric transport nurse at the Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford. Her art draws content from her cultural heritage as a native Californian of Filipina American extraction. Terry's work has been exhibited in California, Hawaii, New York, Canada, the Philippines, Germany, and Belgium.


Works are for sale directly from the artist. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator Stanford Art Spaces (650) 725-3622, marigros@stanford.edu


Lenore Chinn


Walt Whitman's Recital -© 1998 Lenore Chinn
"I am a painter of great intimacy, and in many of my works I explore domestic interiors and the people or objects associated with them. As an American realist I follow the tradition of genre painting which finds its roots in the works of such artists as Mary Cassatt, Berthe Morisot, and Edouard Manet. But the psychological purpose of my works, frequently depicting solitary, introspective figures, adds another dimension to the definition.

"One is made to feel in close proximity to the subject situated on or near the picture plane. But the figure is independent of the observer, isolated in contemplative thought. And this isolation is heightened by the visual simplicity of my painting's construction. The technical aspects of each work (use of color, attention to detail and placement of "props") are employed to accentuate the figure's juxtaposition of hue, and are used to control the impact of each compositional area. The end result is a psychological outreach which evokes strong intimate personal feeling."

Lenore Chinn is a second generation Asian American artist whose realistic acrylics on canvas have been exhibited in juried regional and national exhibitions. Her visibility as an artist and a community activist in the San Francisco Bay Area has generated much interest in her works, which frequently make visual references to the lesbian and gay cultures. The artist's signature pieces, with their crisply rendered compositions, have been the focus of numerous artist profiles, academic discourses on contemporary visual artists, and several international women's anthologies.


Works are for sale directly from the artist. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator Stanford Art Spaces (650) 725-3622, marigros@stanford.edu


Seta Injeyan


Angel's Flight - © 1998 Seta Injeyan
"The road symbolizes for me a process by which I seek personal realignment. It's a transfer of libido into a channeled flow. My working process starts with photographing highway scenes while driving. Looking at the images later I can re-experience the energy, and it becomes intertwined with my inner images. I try to transmit this energy onto the working surface. The final outcome is an abstract expression of an inner-outer process. The outer landscape mirrors an inner landscape and direction in life. This awareness helps one become whole by realizing God and the spirit within."

Seta Injeyan received her BFA from the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, CA. Since then she has been working and exhibiting in Southern California. The Gail Harvey Gallery in Santa Monica exhibits and sells her art.


Works are for sale directly from the artist. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator Stanford Art Spaces (650) 725-3622, marigros@stanford.edu


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