Stanford Art Spaces
July 30, 2004 to September 23, 2004, Stanford Art Spaces features this exhibit:

Katie Hawkinson
Paintings
Sofie Siegmann
Paintings
Joseph Slusky
Sculpture
Jie Zhou
Paintings

Yellow Blue Hula Hoops © 2004

A Bed of Leaves © 2004

Open City © 2004

Red Rose © 2004


This exhibit is located on the Stanford University campus, primarily in the Center for Integrated Systems (CIS). The building is open 8:30 am to 5 pm, Monday through Friday. A directory is available at the CIS reception desk.

Most works are for sale directly from the artists. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator, at (650) 725-3622 or marigros@stanford.edu

Katie Hawkinson
 

Big Blue Circus Stripes © 2004

Katie Hawkinson has lived and worked in the Bay Area since 1984. Sharing a studio with her husband, sculptor Joseph Slusky, Hawkinson teaches drawing and design at the University of California. She has degrees in painting from the University of Washington and the Rhode Island School of Design. Throughout her career as a painter, printmaker, and sculptor, Hawkinson has been engaged in exploration and invention. She has worked in a range of media and processes, from oil to the development of her own egg tempera, in order to effectively respond to the richness of the environment that inspires her. Hawkinson’s abstract works employ rich and vibrant color, pattern, and geometry, evoking both early American folk Art and Modernism. Everyday objects and conditions of life inform her diverse and expansive body of work. Her painted wood sculptures add depth to the forms suggested in her paintings.




Sofie Siegmann
 
Red Clouds / Big Loops © 2004

For more Sofie Siegmann art, click here.

“Growing up in Switzerland meant living in a small country. I sought adventure and moved to spacious California. The sunlight, the lightheartedness of people driving everywhere in cars, and no rain for six months straight has changed how I think and feel. I see colors and apply them onto the canvas: luminous, translucent and thick as tar. Colors are about contrasts and the right combination of light and dark. Then the painting will start to sing and dance on the canvas. Movement is an integral part of my work. Every layer of paint marks a part of my life and the passage of time. I am interested in the various layers: revealing, concealing and exposing them again by scraping with various tools. Although my paintings are abstract, they are also personal and suggestive. There is a sense of openness to the interpretation of them; they are emotionally charged, but appear different each day with every mood. The pool of associations the viewer can pull from is unlimited. I am interested in a playful interaction with myself, where new and unexpected things happen. Painting is like a language that evolves and changes over time. It is a quest to make the unconscious emerge. Inspiration and creativity are a driving force, enabling us to move ahead.”




Joseph Slusky
 
Zebulon © 2004

“My abstract painted metal sculptures attempt to explore the realms of the subconscious. The premise is that within one there are structures waiting to be “excavated” or revealed. The finished works are like fossils – the imagination captured and preserved. The fascination and intrigue with the metal medium lies in its hardness and intransigence as contrasted with the more ephemeral human qualities of flesh and fluid. I do not work from models or sketches. I have no desire to have preconceived ideas about how the finished work will appear.”

Joseph Slusky was educated at Berkeley and also attended Lund University in Sweden. He presently teaches in the architecture department at Berkeley.





For more Joseph Slusky art, click here.




Jie Zhou
 
Dancing by the Creek © 2004

For more Jie Zhou art, click here.

“Water was everywhere in Suzhou, China, where I grew up with my grandmother. It was under stone bridges, in dingy canals, and pre-summer rains, offsetting the world of white walls and dark roofs where people napped in quiet afternoons. That water showed me what it is like to leave nothing untouched, to be constantly changing, and the harmony of wholeness.

“Life is an odyssey that moves relentlessly toward joy, in spite of suffering. This is why I am moved by the power and grace of common people working and living together, something that resembles an embrace, or, more aptly, a dance. This dance of the everyday imparts the entanglement of people across time and across cultures. In it, there is a suggestion of harmony and justice. The temperate colors and gray tones of my childhood as well as the discoveries of beauty in more vivid hues from my adulthood have lingered in my paintings. I want to share all this with you.”



Most works are for sale directly from the artists. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator, at (650) 725-3622 or marigros@stanford.edu
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