Stanford Art Spaces
May 28, 2004 to July 22, 2004, Stanford Art Spaces features this exhibit:

Barbara Allie
Paintings
Omar Chacon
Paintings
Tom Gehrig
Mixed Media Paintings

Dangaling Conversation © 2004

Untitled #27 © 2004

4th Ascent on Confusion Hill © 2004


This exhibit is located on the Stanford University campus, primarily in the Center for Integrated Systems (CIS). The building is open 8:30 am to 5 pm, Monday through Friday. A directory is available at the CIS reception desk.

Most works are for sale directly from the artists. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator, at (650) 725-3622 or marigros@stanford.edu

Barbara Allie

 

Doppelganger II © 2004

My latest artwork is figurative and more autobiographical. Because I do not want to paint realistic images, I use the figure as a symbol to address universal issues, while maintaining some residue of the essence of a person. I see the figures in my work as archetypal metaphors depicting universal themes relevant to humanity in an ever-changing technological environment. I start with a photo, normally one that I take myself. That way, I can get the basic gesture (body language) I want to use as a springboard to the artwork. After the main layout is on the canvas with pencil, I can paint freely as I did with my earlier abstract paintings. And, then at that point, I am more concerned with getting an emotion to come into my work and have it say something meaningful.

For more Barbara Allie art, click here.




Omar Chacon

 
Untitled #25 © 2004

Untitled #31 (Canaletto) © 2004

In this exhibit, I display three groups of works: purely formal paintings, paintings celebrating art history, and paintings born from flags of South America and Mexico. The formal paintings are a body of work devoid of concept that came into being by pure intuition. This was a chance to push my process and a break for the paintings to flower from concept. The paintings triggered by art history allowed me to experiment with new color schemes from the palettes of the old masters and to play around with composition while celebrating the wonder and beauty that the old masters gave to us. Finally my most recent body of work deals with the flags of South America and Mexico. These paintings take the existing structures of the flags and reconfigure them to create a new South American cosmology in paint. Overall, my work deals with subjects that shine from my heart, things that I have experienced in life, things that are Baroque in thought and fruitful in being.




Tom Gehrig

 

The Artist Tracks a Weather Balloon Into A Dark Star Cluster In The Shape Of A Cane © 2004

For more Tom Gehrig art, click here.

My work of the last ten years has been influenced by the California landscape tradition, specifically the Tonalist School. However, it is my intention to extend this tradition to set a surreal stage for more personal kinds of site-specific happenings. My compositions are about the human condition – the fact that we alter the surface of the planet in both strange and beautiful ways. The odd structures that we build; the formulas that we utilize; the information technologies we’ve created - all are designed to help us understand our environment. In this work, these structures, objects and fragments of information are integrated into the landscape - or juxtaposed with it - to become an integral whole. The works are often surrounded by things that could include mathematics, maps, bits of sentences, poems and other miscellanea. An unusual dichotomy takes place between the theater that is happening within the canvas and the sea of information that it floats upon. I approach each piece as if it were a stage where something is about to happen. Most always, they begin as no particular place, no preconceived single idea or concept. But after a period of time, the work unveils itself. Events or evidence of events are introduced. Throughout much of my work is a sense of the absurd; and finally a somewhat surreal sense of humor that glorifies the odd or taken-for-granted. I find various atmospheric conditions a constant source of inspiration. Many of my works take place at dawn or at dusk… a time when not everything is clear, but color is at its maximum in the sky.



Most works are for sale directly from the artists. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator, at (650) 725-3622 or marigros@stanford.edu
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