Stanford Art Spaces
From April 3, 1998 to May 28, 1998, Stanford Art Spaces features an exhibit by three artists:
Daniella
Paintings
Craig Schindler
Digital Photographs
Patricia Sherwood
Paintings

Il Bacio - © 1998 Daniella

She Wanted the Ocean
© 1998 Craig Schindler

Happy Hour - © 1998 Patricia Sherwood

This exhibit is located on the Stanford University campus in four buildings: the Allen Center for Integrated Systems (CIS), Gates Computer Science, Terman Engineering Center, and Humanities and Sciences.    

Daniella


Il Bacio - © 1998 Daniella
Daniela follows in the footsteps of her uncle Albert Lindi, a renowned Swiss artist. Having begun her studies in Switzerland, Daniela came to the United States to expand her knowledge and abilities. As an art student in Marin County, she began to draw attention to her fresh style. Her works were first displayed last year at the Art Show of the National League of American Pen Women, Inc. In 1996 Daniela's work was seen at the Sausalito Art Festival and the West Portal Fine Arts Festival. Her works were featured in an art gallery in Sausalito and will be displayed in 1998 in galleries in San Francisco.

From the beginning, Daniela has been fascinated by Cubism, geometrical forms and light infusion. This interest has brought a contemporary style to her paintings, inspired by experience and emotions. Operas, such as Tosca and Cavalleria Rusticana, have influenced her work.


Works are for sale directly from the artist. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator Stanford Art Spaces (650) 725-3622, marigros@stanford.edu


Craig Schindler


She Wanted the Ocean
© 1998 Craig Schindler
Schindler considers himself to be a "Digital Artist". He has been working with 3-dimensional programs on a Macintosh for over three years and has come to a point where his imagination and the computer are intertwined. His pieces embody new ways of thinking about form, color, perspective, light, and shadow. With each new advancement in hardware and software, the possibilities for new forms of expression increase.

Schindler begins by creating a set of computer simulated 3-dimensional objects. He composes them into a spatial arrangement, wrapping colors, patterns, and textures around each object. Simulated lights are then added, and a viewpoint is chosen, along with camera angle and depth of field. Finally, a ray-tracing program is used to generate and print a photo-surrealistic image of the desired size.

Using human forms, he creates a mythology for synthetic life, a mythology that is both sensual and mechanical, both realistic and surrealistic. It represents science and nature's struggle and final union, which emerges as art imitating life, imitating art.


Works are for sale directly from the artist. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator Stanford Art Spaces (650) 725-3622, marigros@stanford.edu


Patricia Sherwood


Happy Hour - © 1998 Patricia Sherwood
These paintings are about a different landscape one seen from above and, at the same time, from the traditional ground view. A recent critic said "a good abstract painting should make your mouth water." These paintings hopefully do with large swashes of buttery paint in khaki tones interspersed with black lines and flat areas of colorful wash. These are layered canvases with powerful drawing elements, carved into or painted in black. These are creamy textured studies in brush and palette knife. Dark browns, cool blues and touches of clear reds and yellows are painted in casual bands of color outlined by darker tones. These are tension-filled, layered canvases with powerful elements of landscape drawn and carved; and layered, luminous compositions of controlled chaos asymmetrically awkward and full of creative energy.

Her works have been in many solo and group exhibitions including the Oakland Museum, the Triton Museum, the San Francisco Art Festival, the Charles and Emm Frye Museum in Seattle, the d.p. Fong Galleries, and the San Jose Museum of Art. She had taught for many years at West Valley College. This past year she was awarded a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, allowing her to exhibit and publish a catalogue of her works in a museum of her choice.


Works are for sale directly from the artist. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator Stanford Art Spaces (650) 725-3622, marigros@stanford.edu


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