Stanford Art Spaces
May 16, 2003 to July 10, 2003, Stanford Art Spaces features an exhibit by three artists:

DeWitt Cheng
Paintings
Mark Grim
Paintings
Andrew Alan Totman
Paintings and Prints

Weep for the sorrow of your sins © 2003

Karaoke for Experts © 2003

Learn to be still © 2003


This exhibit is located on the Stanford University campus in two buildings: the Center for Integrated Systems (CIS) and Terman Engineering Center. It is open 8:30 am to 5 pm, Monday through Friday. A directory is available at the CIS reception desk.

Most works are for sale directly from the artists. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator, at (650) 725-3622 or marigros@stanford.edu
DeWitt Cheng


© 2003

DeWitt’s hybrid surreal creatures evolve from small drawings and collages. Working loosely from these plans, he paints quickly and freely, using oils and alkyds (a synthetic oil). He steers a middle course between form and color, so that the image and the act of creation are interlinked and fused. “I want the picture to come to life on its own accord, a spontaneous generation that takes place mysteriously only after preparation and work, vision and revision.” DeWitt relates this process to that described by surrealist Max Ernst, who said he participated in the birth of his works as a spectator.

“My work is strange, enigmatic, and to some people disturbing. I want to provoke complex contradictory emotions in the viewer. He or she should identify with these animals - tragic and funny, innocent and mysterious, pathetic and scary, impassioned and ironic, scapegoat and saint.” DeWitt selects religious and philosophical titles to further this identification by confusing and entangling the identities of viewer and subject. There are thematic similarities to baroque paintings of martyrdoms (also solitary figures in extremis), but in his imagery man is no longer the measure of all things; or, if so, only partially as in the works of Bosch, Redon, Kubin, Ernst and others.



Mark Grim


© 2003

The images in Mark’s work draw on art history and the day-to-day world around him. He attempts to synthesize the recognizable and the abstracted. The end result contains echoes of the familiar, but its ultimate sources cannot be pinned down easily. “This approach gives me the flexibility to work with both image and surface without being overly indebted to either one, thus keeping my options open longer.”

There is no predetermined æsthetic position in his work. “A painting doesn’t have to be about pre-existing standards but can forge, through the painting process, a standard of its own. Like a developing child, it surprises us with unforeseen personality traits.” Often the struggle to find coherence ends in failure, an unavoidable and necessary part of the process. Sometimes his paintings yield forms that are both strange and familiar. When meaning oscillates between these two polarities, he knows he is onto something worth pursuing. “In the end, it is this tension between opposites that interests me and sustains the search.”



Andrew Alan Totman


© 2003

The abstracted figures moving in fields of vibrant colors undoubtedly tie Andrew’s style to the New Figurative movement. His images tell of his journey through German Expressionism and French Symbolism tinged by an undeniable West Coast Pop Art flair. The elemental figures represent the human soul in its daily metamorphosis; in each work, a conflict is enacted between the emotions and feelings of the inner being as opposed to the corporeal being. The figures symbolize both the artist’s alter ego and the universal spirit shared by all, independently of race, gender, and creed. The continuous acceptance of his pictures in various shows from Asia to Latin America, Europe and across the United States indicates that his work holds the particular elusive quality that identifies a work of art as timeless in scope and intent. Although he was born in Northern California, Andrew presently lives in Australia.



Most works are for sale directly from the artists. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator, at (650) 725-3622 or marigros@stanford.edu
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