Stanford Art Spaces
August 23, 2002 to October 17, 2002, Stanford Art Spaces features an exhibit of ceramic sculpture and quilts / textile arts:

Nina Else
Ceramic Sculpture
Tracey Brookshier, Susan Else, Suzan Friedland, and Christine Sodt
Quilts / Textile Arts







This exhibit is located on the Stanford University campus in four buildings: the Center for Integrated Systems (CIS), Gates Computer Science, Terman Engineering Center, and Humanities and Sciences. It is open 8:30 am to 5 pm, Monday through Friday. A directory is available at the CIS reception desk.

Most works are for sale directly from the artists. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator, at (650) 725-3622 or marigros@stanford.edu
Nina Else


© 2002

In 1984 Nina started a transition from painting and collage to ceramic sculpture but has managed to keep a foot in both camps. All her work is hand-created, using colorful low-fire glazes and stains, acrylic paint, and the masonry epoxy PC7. The element of collage is most evident in her wall pieces and her two sided rotating tableaux pieces. Her box “games” cross into interactive sculpture, almost toys, and the latest loaf of pod pieces continue her trademark playfulness. She hopes as always to just make us ultimately feel delight.



Tracey Brookshier

© 2002

“I am inspired by antique graphic quilts with strong lines and repetitious forms. My quilts are original, though some are based on traditional block patterns. Fabric always drives the design - I buy something wonderful and figure out how to use it in a way that pleases me. I want viewers to say ‘Wow!’, when they see one of my quilts on a wall.”

Susan Else

© 2002

“Work is play and play is work. I feel privileged to be working in fabric arts now, when so many materials and techniques are up for grabs. A few years ago I got tired of making flat quilts, and I began to use fabric and various stuffing materials to create three-dimensional work. Escaping the flat surface led me to experiment in other areas. (If you break one rule, you might as well ditch the rest!) Paint, yarn, beads, feathers, and other oddities began appearing in my pieces as well. My work is changing so fast now that I can hardly keep up with it, and I have no idea where it will take me next.”

Suzan Friedland

© 2002

“Warmth, texture, and utilitarian beauty are strengths of textile arts. While acknowledging these roots in my work, I am compelled to go beyond the boundaries of traditional media and design. A central theme in my work is an exploration of the balance between traditional textile works and contemporary forms in various media. In an attempt to achieve a more fluid style, I combine the traditional materials of textile art with painting and surface manipulation. A primary source of inspiration is the color and topography of the natural landscape. The paradox of trying to capture changing elements has been strongly influenced by my Zen practice. I also find inspiration in discussions of form and relationship with scientists and mathematicians.”

Christine Sodt

© 2002

“When I was young, sewing was serious business. I was taught garment construction and the ‘right way’ to sew, but most importantly I learned that I loved fabric. These many years and garments later, I’ve given up the ‘right way’, and I sew with reckless abandon. I love the threads of fabric: I remove color from them, add color to them, tear them, fray them, and finally sew - most of - them down. Each piece of fabric is a brush stroke of color, design, texture, and a piece of a story. Each story is brought forth with discovery, creativity, and joy.”



Most works are for sale directly from the artists. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator, at (650) 725-3622 or marigros@stanford.edu
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