Stanford Art Spaces
May 26, 2000 to July 20, 2000, Stanford Art Spaces features an exhibit by three artists:

John Cadigan
Natasha Foucault
Barbara Milman





The exhibit is located on the Stanford University campus in four buildings: the Allen Center for Integrated Systems (CIS), Gates Computer Science, Terman Engineering, and Humanities and Sciences.    

Most works are for sale directly from the artists. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator, at (650) 725-3622 or marigros@stanford.edu

John Cadigan

Mother And Child   © 2000 "Asking an artist to explain his work is like asking a plant to explain horticulture"
    - Jean Cocteau
"I think in images, not in words. What influences me? People, dreams, art history, ancient artifacts, (e.g., Balinese masks, Mexican folk art, Yupik masks, Inuit art, African sculpture) and found objects. They speak to me on a spiritual level, and I must create with them. The object is born in my work, made to live another life. I am fascinated by mythology and am working to create a visual vocabulary of mythical imagery through which I explore the imagination, the unconscious. My work may be akin to a dream - mysterious, elusive - yet containing parts of everyday life and oneís history.
"On a formal level, I love working with line and pattern, juxtaposing organic and geometric lines, while drawing on the power of black and white images. I feel a deep affinity with the process of creating woodcuts, where I can combine my love of drawing with my passion for sculpture."
John Cadigan is a visual artist trained at the College of Fine Arts at Carnegie-Mellon University. He studied painting and printmaking in Italy. Cadiganís woodcuts and etchings have been exhibited in museums, galleries and community centers nationwide. A set of his prints recently finished a two year national tour with the group show, Truth From Darkness: Works by artists with mental illness. Cadiganís current artistic focus is on relief printmaking.


Natasha Foucault

Suzdal, Russia   © 2000

Window In Riga   © 2000

"... Iím trying to make my painting a mirror for you, a mirror that reveals poetry, beauty, spirituality of your inner world that you may have not yet discovered."

Natasha Foucault was born in Russia where she received a MA from the Moscow Art Academy. She has gained recognition for her luminous silk paintings, including representative and fantasy landscapes, still-lifes, and a range of other subjects. Natasha works exclusively with silk as a fine artist and as a designer of wearable clothing. Her work can be found in private collections in Europe, Canada, and the United States. Recently Natasha has had a one-woman show at the silk museum in the Netherlands. She has also been teaching throughout the United States for many years.



Barbara Milman

China Doll Cabinet   © 2000 "In 1994 I visited Auschwitz. In nearby Krakow, I saw hundreds of small carved wooden 'folk' statues of Jews for sale. My immediate reaction was, ĎFirst they try to kill off all the Jews, and then they make a business of Jewish nostalgia.í Suddenly I realized that these wooden Jews were really not different from Cigar Store Indians, and I wondered how Native-Americans tolerate the Indian Kitsch that is so prevalent in the United States. This revelation led to a series I titled The Nostalgia Factory, addressing the issues of racism and ethnic stereotyping in the U.S., as well as anti-Semitism and stereotyping of Jews by Nazis and others.
"These works use a large variety of media, including prints, painting, photography, and assemblage. I incorporated stereotyped images, racist or kitsch objects that I found in antique stores, wooden Jewish figures from Poland, photographs of Auschwitz, and images of contemporary artists and poets of various ethnic backgrounds. In addition to combining many different media, these pieces combine conflicting emotions, such as irony, sadness, and anger."

Japanese-American Fan   © 2000


Most works are for sale directly from the artists. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator, at (650) 725-3622 or marigros@stanford.edu

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