Stanford Art Spaces
March 24, 2000 to May 18, 2000, Stanford Art Spaces features an exhibit by three artists:

JoAnne Horsfall Beasley
Elizabeth Gómez
Tony Speirs

From Skyline © 1999

Migration © 1999

Wish © 1999


This exhibit is located on the Stanford University campus in four buildings: the Allen Center for Integrated Systems (CIS), Gates Computer Science, Terman Engineering Center, and Humanities and Sciences.    

Most works are for sale directly from the artists. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator, at (650) 725-3622 or marigros@stanford.edu

JoAnne Horsfall Beasley


    Cherry Flat © 1999    


    The Railroad Bridge © 1999    
After moving from Ohio to California many years ago, JoAnne Horsfall Beasley returned to landscape painting, a deep interest held since adolescence. The magnificent landscape of the West rekindled her love for the patterns and moods of the natural world. The current exhibit, “A Sense of Place,” includes oil pastel landscapes of the Trinity Alps of Northern California and scenes from the Stanford campus.

Oil pastels have been her preferred media for the past twenty years. The intensity of color, creaminess of application, and spontaneity of execution are the particular qualities she enjoys. Experimentation with various papers and surfaces, and in particular, the ability to change size and dimension while working, allows her to create and develop changing formats. Working on the pictures both on the wall and under her hand, permits an unusual amount of detail. Some of the artists she admires are Vermeer, Cezanne, Van Gogh and more contemporary painters are Joseph Raphael and Patricia Tobacco Forrester.

Also see JoAnne Beasley's website



Elizabeth Gómez


    Lion Fountain © 1999    


    Vegetarian Lion © 1999    
The work of Elizabeth Gómez portrays the intrinsic connection between humans, animals, and plants. Her painted stories mix fantastic with prosaic, and lighthearted whimsy with deeper reverberations. The women in her paintings identify with the animals and vice versa. Both are metaphors for one another.

She expresses a deeply felt need for spiritual ecology in her paintings and prints. “I constantly wonder about the causes and consequences of a stronger one overpowering a weaker one, both in the wild and in our human reality.”

Her work is influenced by artists of the Latin American Magic Realist movement who explore reality through fantastical transformations and by Mexican popular art which is a blend of traditions, myths, and humor with Baroque, colonial, and Catholic roots. She has also been influenced by the jewel-like Persian and Indian miniatures, constantly striving for work that has the honesty of hand-made crafts by using characteristics such as “over-decoration,” space-flattening patterns, and attention to detail. Her women are shown in a frontal iconic manner, similar to that of the retablos of popular Mexican Catholicism.

Also see Elizabeth Gómez's website



Tony Speirs


    Wish © 1999    


    The Sorcerer's Apprentice © 1999    


    All Around Me © 1999    
During his early career, Tony Spiers developed an interest in the classic children’s book illustrations of artists such as N.C. Wyeth, which led him to study illustration at the Academy of Art College in San Francisco. He then shifted his focus to creating fine art paintings and developed the style and techniques in his current works.

He first draws in charcoal on heavy paper, working gesturally, erasing and scratching into the surface. He is frequently inspired by music; words from lyrics and other thoughts are often written and scratched into the background. The finished drawing is sealed and mounted onto a canvas-covered support, and color is built up through a series of transparent oil glazes. The result is a painting that glows from within a darker framework, with an appearance of stained glass.

He describes his role as both an artist and a story-teller. Recurrent themes in his paintings are relationship and home, often with an autobiographical link. Figures exist in a rural or small-town environment, recalling a simpler time. He often includes personal symbolic imagery, using dogs, deer, ladders, butterflies, masks, and moons. They float and fly through a world of shifting perspectives, evoking dreams or memories, reminiscent of artists such as Marc Chagall.



Most works are for sale directly from the artists. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator, at (650) 725-3622 or marigros@stanford.edu

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