Stanford Art Spaces
August 20, 1999 to October 14, 1999, Stanford Art Spaces features an exhibit by four artists:
Sherry Smith Bell
Lynn Curtis
Violet Fields
Elizabeth Paganelli

Etchings

Paintings

Paintings

Mixed Media Monotypes


This exhibit is located on the Stanford University campus in four buildings: the Allen Center for Integrated Systems (CIS), Gates Computer Science, Terman Engineering Center, and Humanities and Sciences.     Reception 3pm-5pm on October 1 at CIS

Sherry Smith Bell


The Bell House    
© 1999 Sherry Smith Bell    

inked areas. A stencil color rolled on top of an already inked area intensifies the color tone.

My visual ideas use objects such as doors, windows, and houses as metaphors for change. The emotional states of solitude, expansiveness, peace, and serenity are evoked by architectural images. These images deal with change as the only constant in perception and in art.

My artistic concerns of the l990ís focus on larger format dry point. Working directly with traditional etching tools on thin plastic plates achieves spontaneity of line. The drypoint burr creates a 3-dimensional quality to the line itself, while the cut pieces of plastic produce embossed edges. This jigsaw puzzle-like layering of plastic shapes gives a feeling of depth. Tonal effects are achieved by abrading the plastic plates with sandpaper and using the mezzotint rocker and the roulette. Color gradations are achieved by selective wiping of separately



    The Vernon House
    © 1999 Sherry Smith Bell

Works are for sale directly from the artist. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator Stanford Art Spaces (650) 725-3622, marigros@stanford.edu


Lynn Curtis


Ravine To The Sea    
© 1999 Lynn Curtis    



working the paint like watercolor. As the paint dries, I slowly build up the surface through a series of glazes. This process develops depth through the layering of color, as well as maintaining the brilliance and clarity of each color.

In my imagery, the representation of light is especially important: the warm light and long shadows of late afternoon, the softness of early morning, or the starkness of mid-day. The play of light on water and the resulting fragmented images are

Inspiration for my paintings derives from the landscapes of California, Oregon, and Washington, where my family and I hike the many coastal, mountain, and desert trails. Returning to my studio, I develop my impressions, using acrylic on canvas, to create paintings that reflect the beauty and solitude of these landscapes.

Although my work is representational, the composition is quite abstract. I use strong diagonals to lead the viewer into the space. Placement of shapes provides a constant flow and movement within the canvas, often with an energy that wants to break from its boundaries.

I begin my paintings in a very loose manner, keeping the canvas flat, and


    Eagles View
    © 1999 Lynn Curtis
fascinating to me. Rarely do you find a man-made object in my paintings. A fence may sometimes appear, but only one that has weathered and grown into the landscape. No buildings or people are to be seen.

Works are for sale directly from the artist. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator Stanford Art Spaces (650) 725-3622, marigros@stanford.edu


Violet Fields


Tall Tale    
© 1999 Violet Fields    


Many of the familiar elements that characterize my earlier paintings remain, such as the spell scribbling and the mysterious appearances of creatures, veils, stones, and landscapes. The new elements of high contrast, mass and peep holes have seldom been seen in earlier work, but seem to have come to settle in and make their contribution to the ongoing story of my
My recent work jumps and tiptoes toward reflecting a more familiar vantage point. Its hope of lifting from the ground and moving in usual flight patterns is frustrated by the weight of substance.

Creating these paintings has been a different journey than I have known in the past. They have demanded my conscious negotiation, along with the usual intuition and inspiration that feeds it. The poet Kay Lindsey might say, these paintings are "dancing in the dark." They are expressing tales of woe and the celebration of victory.


    From The Other Side
    © 1999 Violet Fields
newer pieces. The hushed tones of beforegive way to full voice, to songs or sirens, to stories or poems, and to a new language for me to learn and embrace.

Works are for sale directly from the artist. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator Stanford Art Spaces (650) 725-3622, marigros@stanford.edu


Elizabeth Paganelli



   
© 1999 Elizabeth Paganelli    


In my current work I am exploring the diversity of mixed media monotype. I use lithographic inks mixed with modifiers on a Plexiglas plate, experimenting with viscosity and layering of inks to achieve rich color and depth. In my art I balance the weight of flat shapes and space, adding the expressiveness of line. After the monotype is complete, I embellish it with oil paint, pastels, and prisma-color.

I begin my process searching to find that moment when I become totally absorbed, and my inner space comes into life with the creative spirit. Working in a spontaneous way, I look to reconnect my heart with my mind and get in touch with rhythms, balance, and harmony of universal consciousness. Once Iím fully engaged in the process, the intuitive language of the unconscious emerges and the work takes on a life of its own.

Art empowers and vitalizes my life. It produces balance within my social, intellectual, and emotional existence. The creative process has the power to heal, revitalize, and rehabilitate. Through my process I have discovered that the creative spirit is inherent in all of us. It is the force infusing all of lifeís energy. It emerges when the artist surrenders herself to the moment. The form creates itself. The artist becomes not the maker but only a vehicle in the process.

Works are for sale directly from the artist. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator Stanford Art Spaces (650) 725-3622, marigros@stanford.edu


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