Stanford Art Spaces
From June 18, 1999 to August 12, 1999, Stanford Art Spaces features an exhibit by two artists:
Stefan Barton
Drawings, Collographs & Paintings
Raymond Howell
Paintings - 40 Year Retrospective
   
  Solid Spin                   First Symbol
© 1999 Stefan Barton
Illinois Jacquet           Miles Davis        
© 1999 Raymond Howell

This exhibit is located on the Stanford University campus in four buildings: the Allen Center for Integrated Systems (CIS), Gates Computer Science, Terman Engineering Center, and Humanities and Sciences.     Reception 3pm-5pm on June 18 at CIS

Stefan Barton


First Symbol
© 1999 Stefan Barton





Kiss of Element
© 1999 Stefan Barton
I create in order to satisfy and express my own personal aesthetic taste and curiosity. Using a specific language of lines, colors, and values, I explore an internal vision; guided by a sense of gracefulness, I explore the surreal and mysterious. I depict the unfamiliar or the familiar in unfamiliar circumstances in order to express our imperfect and limited perception of reality. I want to elicit curiosity in order to test our will to understand and interpret, while simultaneously testing our capability to misunderstand and misinterpret.

In my art I integrate my understanding of the ambiguous nature of light, the fluctuating world in motion and rotation on microscopic and macroscopic scales. Organic shapes, elements of architecture, a translucent geometry, and strange logic all interact to produce an incarnation of a plastic reality.

I execute my drawings in a careful and deliberate way. I want them to be imaginary photos, ready to be experienced as realistic pictures from some "other side." In contrast, although the plates I use are carefully planned and built, inherent in them is an element of randomness stemming from the materials and the printing process itself. Some of these prints are "overdubbed" with pencil or brush in order to refine them and to add to their substance. In my paintings there is more acute energy, more spontaneity, but still an atmosphere of place, event, and condition. The brush enhances the expression and extends its reach.

In the end, my hope is that my imagination is intriguing, that my aesthetic can be shared. How my work my be interpreted to reflect on psychological, social or historical conditions, this I leave to others.


Works are for sale directly from the artist. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator Stanford Art Spaces (650) 725-3622, marigros@stanford.edu


Raymond Howell


Colored Girls
© 1999 Raymond Howell




Diana Ross
© 1999 Raymond Howell




Playland
© 1999 Raymond Howell




Session
© 1999 Raymond Howell



 
Jazzman                     Sara Tomatoe  
© 1999 Raymond Howell



My career began at age eight, when I was required to do life-size images of my second grade classmates on the blackboard, punishment for sketching in class. My formal schooling ended by the fifth grade. After "graduating" from reform school and foster homes, I dedicated myself to art. I am both artistically and academically self-educated.

By the age of thirty I was able to be a full-time self-supporting artist. Numerous one man shows were held in San Francisco, Los Angeles, Boston and Provincetown. Also, I did a one man exhibit, "San Francisco Night Life", which took one year of work and involved 24 locations.

A major highlight was participating in the opening of the Oakland Museum. The "Brown Painting", in the "Black Perspective" exhibition, was later purchased by the museum for its permanent collection. The following years I opened my own gallery and art school where I developed and perfected a new process which I applied to serigraph printing. I continue to do commissioned portraits.

During the seventies and eighties I exhibited throughout the United States, won many awards, and introduced my original serigraph prints at the International Art Expositions in New York and San Francisco. I participated in foundation, direction and teaching at Project Dare, an art school for minority/poor children in San Francisco.

In 1990 Jeffrey Pollack commissioned me to do an epic mural called the "Italian Mural of San Francisco" for his New Joe's Restaurant. The mural is curved 6' x 43', and depicts the history of Italians in San Francisco.

Throughout my career, I have received recognition in publications such as The Christian Science Monitor, Art Forum, Black Artists on Art.


Works are for sale directly from the artist. For information, contact M. Grossman, Curator Stanford Art Spaces (650) 725-3622, marigros@stanford.edu


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